Archives For smoke barrier

Watch the ICC Live!

April 22, 2013 — Leave a comment

View the hearings on your desktop computer or your Blackberry, iPhone, iPad or Android pad via webcast from the ICC.

 

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The code change proposals that the Patient Fire Safety Coalition will be opposing will, most likely, be heard on Wednesday evening and Thursday morning (April 24-25).

 

 

Speak out for Healthcare Fire Safety!

Are you attending the ICC Committee Action hearings in Dallas?

Download important information about proposed changes to the International Fire Code that seek to reduce safety in hospitals.

 

The International Firestop Council has published a brochure, Move America’s Healthcare Fire Safety Forward, to bring attention to the potentially harmful code change proposals to be presented by the healthcare industry.  At the International Code Council Fire Code Action Hearings, the hospital industry, through the ICC AHC, will introduce code change proposals to the IFC designed to simplify and streamline the constraints under which healthcare facilities operate.  We believe that most of them are very good and will assist code enforcement in healthcare facilities. Unfortunately, among those other worthwhile proposals, there are a few that would be quite contrary to the goals of a fire safe hospital environment.

Download, MOVE AMERICA’S HEALTHCARE FIRE SAFETY FORWARD, brochure now.

The International Firestop Council is confident that the various stakeholders can better work together to provide optimized solutions that balance healthcare operational considerations with patient and worker fire safety.  Code change proposals F212-13, F218-13, and F239-13 are flawed ideas which concerned individuals need to speak out against at the Committee Action hearing.

The International Firestop Council, along with the Patient Fire Safety Coalition, is calling all code officials dedicated to public safety to step up to the mic and let your voice be heard in Dallas, on April 23-25.

 

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Call to Action

April 7, 2013 — Leave a comment

As the ICC Committee Action Hearing draws near we would like to make you aware of several critical code change proposals that the healthcare industry will attempt to get passed.  These changes negatively effect responders and patients life safety in hospitals (I-2 occupancies).

The healthcare industry proposes to:

• Discontinue maintenance of existing smoke and fire barriers (IFC 1103.1/1104.1; F212-13)

• Consider glass walls in sprinklered buildings to be 1 hour rated (IFC 1103.4.1; F218-13)

• Eliminate fire resistance rated corridors (IFC 1105.3.2; F239-13)

• Treat existing smoke barriers as ½ hour rated, not requiring any fire stopping or opening protectives (IFC 1105.5.2; F241-13)

The Patient Fire Safety Coalition is an advocacy group that serves patients and individuals who become “not capable of self-preservation”; ensuring that they will be safe in their healing environment. The Patient Fire Safety Coalition is the voice for those who cannot speak, and a watch dog to make certain that health care facilities maintain the highest standards of fire protection and life safety.

We need code officials and AHJ’s to speak against these changes in Dallas.  Please join the cause. If you would like more information contact us at info@patientfiresafety.org.

When a fire occurs that results in death, it is very rare to find that the victims died due to actual fire or flame impingement.  Much more common is death by smoke.  When items begin to burn the particles they are made up of begin to break down (this is smoke), and those particles become toxic.  There are three ways that smoke can kill a person:

  1. Particles. Tiny, burned, unburned, and partially burned substances penetrate into the respiratory system and lodge into the lungs.  Some of these particles can be toxic, they can cause respiratory functions to cease,  or they can be super-heated causing the lungs to burn and fail.
  2. Vapors. Fog-like droplets that poison the body if inhaled or absorbed through the skin.
  3. Toxic gases.  Carbon monoxide, hydrogen cyanide, and phosgene are the most common types found in fires.  These gases are all put off by common household items that we all may have; items such as plastic, foam, and vinyl. These gases displace the oxygen in your bloodstream, or bond to it leading to death.

This short video shows the importance of utilizing products and assemblies that prevent the spread of smoke:

The health care industry continues to fight for the removal and neglect of these smoke barriers. Think of the lives that could be affected if smoke from even a small fire is allowed to move freely through the corridors and rooms of a one of these facilities.  Lives that could have been saved by nothing more than a rated smoke barrier, may now be lost due to the harmful effects of smoke that was permitted to move uninhibited throughout the space.

Stand with the Patient Fire Safety Coalition on April 21-30, 2013 in Dallas to oppose these code change proposals and be a voice for those who may not have one.